How to Make Hotels More Human

Isn’t it strange that technology designed to bring people together could have the opposite effect? As smartphones and tablets have become more engrained in daily life, prospects for real human interaction feel strangely diminished. Why strike up a conversation – or look out the window, for that matter – when there’s always a task, a search, or a social media post to absorb your attention? Academics and researchers have been saying plenty about this in recent years. The Media Consumer Survey 2017 by Deloitte found clear patterns of fatigue amongst social media users in Australia, with nearly half of the study’s respondents stating that they spend more time on social media than they’d like to, and nearly a third admitting that they spend more time cultivating relationships on social media than they do in real life.

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The Biggest Mistakes Hotel Managers Make

If you’re looking for a career where no two days are alike, managing a hotel ought to be right up on your list. The number of details involved in our profession is mind-boggling; virtually every decision we make is an opportunity to strengthen the operation as a whole – or to weaken it. In order to be a successful hotelier, you have to be able to change directions quickly and solve problems on the fly.

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Why chaos is good in hotels (and what we learn from it)

In 1961, a meteorologist named Edward Lorenz was re-doing weather forecasts using standard mathematical formulas of the day. To save time, he rounded longer decimals to the nearest one thousandth — then went for a coffee and let the computer crunch the numbers. When he returned, a completely different set of weather predictions had been generated than what he had expected. This turned out to be a pioneering moment in chaos theory. It led to the notion of the “butterfly effect,” wherein tiny changes create vastly different outcomes.

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