How to Make Hotels More Human

Isn’t it strange that technology designed to bring people together could have the opposite effect? As smartphones and tablets have become more engrained in daily life, prospects for real human interaction feel strangely diminished. Why strike up a conversation – or look out the window, for that matter – when there’s always a task, a search, or a social media post to absorb your attention? Academics and researchers have been saying plenty about this in recent years. The Media Consumer Survey 2017 by Deloitte found clear patterns of fatigue amongst social media users in Australia, with nearly half of the study’s respondents stating that they spend more time on social media than they’d like to, and nearly a third admitting that they spend more time cultivating relationships on social media than they do in real life.

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Beyond 2000: What Successful Hotels Will Like in 2020

Hoteliers who came of age in the 20th century can remember a time when the year 2020 once seemed very far away. By then, people would be making payments on flying cars. We would send hologram messages, like in early Star Wars films. Whatever the world looked like, it would be drastically different. Arthur C. Clarke, the British science fiction writer, predicted the Internet in 1964 with startling accuracy. But at that time, flying cars and holidays to the moon sounded equally plausible.

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Are Hotels Taking Minimalism Too Far?

Back in 2010, a book called The 100 Thing Challenge began flying off the shelves. It’s a personal story about the power of de-cluttering, and a call to action for readers who feel weighed down by the accumulation of material possessions. Readers are challenged to ask themselves: Could I be happier with only 100 things?

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